Supply Chain Institute: Welcome

Supply Chain Institute

Thank you for visiting our new preliminary Internet Site of Supply Chain Institute. As a new resource for BI, operation performance, and risk management, we want to keep you informed of the latest news, advancement in the field, and the offerings of the Institute. To that effect and the opportunity of networking, the site’s content management system has been designed for initial communication. It will enable us to always keep you up to date. With a few simple clicks, you will register on the site and become a member of the mailing list of our institute.

Presently, our web site is still under construction. We are making an effort to present you with our entire spectrum of offers (enhanced by your suggestions and recommendations) as soon as possible. In the near future we will provide you with information regarding BI, risk, and performance analysis in the context of supply chain management. The emphasis of our business is on the new methodology and technology on the core competency and focus of the Institute, Supply Chain Management. This topic is certainly of interest to you. Please register and check this site later. You may email us at info@supplychaininstitute.com or call us at (919)618-0743. Our fax number is (419) 818-8537.

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Risk,BI,Performance: Supply Chain Management

Lecture Series on

Risk, BI, and Performance Management in the Context of Supply and Demand Chain

Supply Chain Institute, Article one – Risk Management

Greetings:


If I may, let me start my journey on this subject with some meaningful quotes from many greats:


“The person who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing, is nothing, and becomes nothing. He may avoid suffering and sorrow, but he simply cannot learn and feel and change and grow and love and live.”

Leo F. Buscaglia quotes(American guru, tireless advocate of the power of love, 1924-1998)

Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.

Andre Gide quotes (French writer, humanist and moralist, 1947 Nobel prize for literature, 18691951)

Often the difference between a successful person and a failure is not one has better abilities or ideas, but the courage that one has to bet on one’s ideas, to take a calculated risk – and to act.

Andre Malraux quotes (FrenchHistorian, Novelist and Statesman, 19011976)

He who risks and fails can be forgiven. He who never risks and never fails is a failure in his whole being.

Paul Tillich quotes (German born AmericanTheologian and Philosopher, whose discussions of God and faith illuminated and bound together the realms of traditional Christianity and modern culture. 18861965)

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

T.S. Eliot quotes (American born English Editor, Playwright, Poet and Critic, 18881965)

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Risk, BI, Performance Management in the Context of Supply and Demand Chain Management

Risk, BI, Performance Management

Greetings;Due to overwhelming demand from colleagues, customers, and market, we will start a new lecture series on Risk, BI, Performance Management, in the context of Supply and Demand Chain. These articles will appear as lecture series as well as the Latest News on this web site. Your participation and contribution is very welcomed and appreciated. We will try to address the said topics from Analytical Approach as well as Management points of view. I look forward to your input, contribution, and comments.Best Regards,Javad Seyed, Ph.D.javad@supplychaininstitute.com

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Blue Print for Success

Falling demand, tight credit, and unprecedented economic challenges are forcing businesses to look for tools and means of reducing cost, increasing productivity, maintain-even increase customer base, avoiding costly initiatives, and improve quality. The essence of this initiative, Supply Chain Institute, is to address these problems by providing analytics, modeling capability, and execution methods to assist with the resolving of the real life business problems.

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Risk Management

Risk Management

For any business, supply and demand chain disruption represent at least, an immediate financial risk, that no business can afford to let it to happen. At worst, any disruption will have long term ramification on the future revenue. The fact of the matter is that disruption doesn’t happen out of a sudden. It is preceded by its precursor signals. These signals either are not detected or are ignored. So a proper proactive risk management program should be designed such that it encompasses and incorporates all active networks of a supply and demand chain. This way, any variance is detected at early stage on the upstream or downstream networks.

In our approach we investigate financial risk, environmental risk, and risk to customers. In a quantitative approach, the bottom line is profit against loss. In methodology we practice, the focus is on identification, evaluation, analysis and optimal management. We believe that any business action or decision generates risk. Consequently we have to learn to live with it. The way that civilizations have rid out the natural disasters exemplifies our recommended approach; risk tolerance. An organization can best survive any interruption or even disaster if risk tolerance is embedded in its infrastructure. This is the basic philosophy of supply chain Institute in dealing with risk.

In near future, we will introduce curriculum of risk management in the form of workshop tailored for industrial applications.

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Supply Chain, Risk, and BI Management

Supply Chain, Risk, and BI Management

Greetings:

In response to colleagues request and market demand for SCM, BI, and Risk, I am initiating a lecture (posting) series under the title of:

“Risk, and Business Intelligence in the context of Supply and Demand Chain Management.”

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Risk Management Workshop

Curriculum In Risk

Risk Management Across Global Supply Chain

Application in Procurement

Summary:

In Today’s competitive market, Risk Management represents a new shift in businesses paradigm. As the economies become more service driven and globally oriented, businesses cannot afford to let new, unforeseen areas of risk remain unidentified and unattended. Currency fluctuations, human resources in foreign countries, evaporating distribution channels, corporate governance, unprecedented dependence on technology, flow of raw material to manufacturing sites, manufacturing process and the logistics of delivery of finished goods are just a few of the new risks businesses must assess and manage.

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Business Intelligence

Business Intelligence

Prelude:

Business Intelligence is information retrieved by analysis of data collected from operational processes of a business. The analysis is based on a presumed mathematical or empirical model defining the data interrelationship. In conjunction with the same information from competition, one may devise a blue print in achieving specified goals. Additionally, in a predictive mode, in depth review and analysis of Business Intelligence, may point toward proactive measures to be taken in meeting the business’s tactical and strategic objectives. In general, Business Intelligence is a barometer of how good or bad a business is running. Consequently, the accurate collection of pertinent data and the understanding of the interrelationships among data have a paramount impact in design of a road map for success. By the same token, proper collection of Business Intelligence from competition, as an initial targeted goals, is also fundamentally important.

Our definition of Business Intelligence is the basis for methods deployed for our operational projects and educational curriculum.

In near future, in the following sections, we will describe commonly used mathematical and empirical methods of Business Intelligence.

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