Lasting Effects of Supply Chain Mismanagement

In New York City, March 25, 1911, 123 women and 23 men died from fire, smoke inhalation, or falling or jumping to their deaths when a fire broke out in the building where their factory resided on the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors.

The incident was known as the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire and is the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of the New York City.

This tragedy and loss of life eventually led to legislation requiring improved factory safety standards.

While this famous incident is over 100-years-old, workplace deaths and injuries are still happening today.

In a recent case, Cusseta, Ala., Regina Elsea was working at an auto parts manufacturer on the assembly line when a mishap occurred, and Elsea was impaled by one of the robots. She died the following day.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration reviewed Elsea’s case and found the contracting company she worked for was in violation of a federal law that could have prevented her death.

Sadly, in both cases these accidents could have been prevented with better evaluation of contractors and adherence to higher standards of safety in the workplace.

Read more at Lasting Effects of Supply Chain Mismanagement

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World Bank and Japan partner to improve disaster risk management in developing countries

World Bank and Japan partner to improve disaster risk management in developing countries

With loss and damages from disasters increasing globally, Japan and the World Bank launched a new program today that will help improve disaster risk management in developing countries. Activities under this program will have a strong focus on strengthening resilience, including risk identification, risk reduction, preparedness and financial protection – connecting Japan’s knowledge with global expertise to support development planning and investment.

“Japan has long been a leader in mainstreaming disaster risk management into the global development agenda, and their own experience shows us that prevention pays,” said Zoubida Allaoua, World Bank Acting Vice President for Sustainable Development. “The new program will have a global outreach, bringing expertise from Japan and beyond to developing countries, to help improve the lives of the people, particularly the poor, who are most vulnerable to disasters.”

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