Trax Expands Leadership Team With CRO Hire

Trax Technologies, a global innovator specializing in harnessing logistics data and insights to improve supply chain performance, announced today the company has expanded its’ leadership team with the appointment of Christopher Rajiah as the Chief Revenue Officer. Rajiah is responsible for setting and executing the company’s go-to-market strategy in order to scale the organization and solidify its position as the market leader for freight audit & payment and supply chain data management.

The executive appointment follows the additions of Elizabeth Hart as CAO and Benjamin Morens as COO in 2016. The expansion of the leadership team comes as Trax Technologies experiences significant product adoption as it transforms the freight audit and payment process to improve supply chain performance. Trax provides freight audit and payment services as a cornerstone of its cloud-based logistics performance management solution combining leading controls, supply chain data management, financial classification, and business analytics to deliver accurate, meaningful and actionable intelligence to its global customers.

“Chris’s extensive experience in successfully driving and executing global sales initiatives and growing strategic partnerships will be incredibly valuable as we continue to innovate, develop new capabilities, and extend Trax’s industry leadership,” said Don Baptiste, Trax Technologies CEO. “I’m excited to have him on our team.”

Rajiah joins from Equinix, where he served as VP of Worldwide Channel Partners and Alliances. Prior to Equinix, Chris was SVP Sales & Marketing at ViaWest, as well as the Vice President of Worldwide Partner Sales at Rackspace Hosting. Chris also spent 9 years at Extreme Networks, where he started his career, and, eventually, led their North American channel and worldwide strategic alliance teams.

Read more at Trax Expands Leadership Team With CRO Hire

If you have any opinions, share with us in the comment box, and subscribe us to get updates.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

New Solutions for Supply Chain Risk Management: A Case Study

We are entering an era where it is becoming possible to detect supply chain risks much more quickly. A case in point is offered by AGCO. AGCO AGCO +1.96% is a global leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of a wide range of agricultural equipment. In a discussion with AGCO’s Jan Theissen, Director of Strategy and Methods, and Jake Stone, Manager of Supply Chain Risk and Contract Management, I learned about this public, Atlanta headquartered corporation’s journey to improve their sourcing and supply base risk management capabilities.

AGCO’s products are marketed under a number of well-known brands, including Challenger, Fendt, GSI, Massey Ferguson and Valtra. The manufacture and assembly of their products occurs at 34 locations worldwide and historically each of these brands was managed as a separate supply chain. Further, because the company had grown by acquisition, these different supply chains used more than 10 different enterprise resource planning (ERP) solutions for direct sourcing.

Beginning in 2012, Mr. Theissen, a newly appointed procurement leader, led a transformation of the sourcing organization. AGCO moved from a fragmented and decentralized procurement to a centralized commodity management structure in order to better leverage buying synergies and increase the overall maturity level of this organization. Implementation of standardized roles and responsibilities, and global policies and procedures, were supported by an extensive change management program. The company formed a School of Purchasing to further develop the capabilities of the organization.

The risks associated with sourcing became part of each category manager’s job; these managers became responsible for supplier risk management, not just savings. Mr. Stone was brought into establish new, systems, processes and capabilities to manage procurement risk. One thing Mr. Stone put in place was a clear communication and escalation process to deal with risks once detected.

Read more at New Solutions for Supply Chain Risk Management: A Case Study

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Why should leaders care about performance management?

Why should leaders care about performance management?

A consistent track record of sound results is the best indicator of leadership potential and capacity. Top-rated leaders are those with a history of repeated high impact results across a variety of contexts and complexities.

Consequently, performance management should be a central issue in every organisation. Sadly, in our experience, this is not so – in a significant number of cases we see leaders covering their incompetence and poor results with blame shifting.

Performance review meetings are seldom welcomed. They are widely regarded as the event about which most employees get no sleep the night before, and most leaders get no sleep the night after. We have observed many organisations in which performance management has been reduced, if not entirely relegated, to a once-a-year paper exercise for a mandatory input for annual salary reviews. We have also seen organisations where the performance appraisal is a one-sided affair in which the manager does all the talking, wanting to get one more unnecessary administrative formality out of the way as quickly as possible. Does this sound familiar?

Helping people achieve the very best results possible is a primary challenge for every leader and lies at the heart of effective performance contracting, reviews, correction and reward.

Here are five tips to improve your management of performance:

1. Reframe the purpose

2. Reframe the label

3. Reframe the timing

4. Reframe the model

5. Reframe your role

Performance is a crucial aspect in management. If you are interested in how to leverage your performance management, feel free to contact us.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone