The Future Of Performance Management Is Not One-Size-Fits-All

In 2013, CEB research found that 86% of organizations had recently made significant changes to their performance management system, or were planning to. In 2014, a Deloitte survey found that 58% percent of companies surveyed did not think performance management was an effective use of time, and many media outlets jumped on the opportunity to air their grievances.

Finally, the rising wave of discontent seemed to crash in 2015, as a slew of large organizations like GE, Accenture, Netflix, and Adobe all scrapped their age-old annual performance management processes in favor of more continuous feedback systems. And many others followed suit.

But, was it the right move for everyone?

Last summer, I wrote an article on this topic myself, urging business leaders to really consider the implications of following these organizations. The issue, in my opinion, is not that these organizations did something wrong. Rather, the risk is that many leaders misinterpreted these stories to mean that they should abandon performance management altogether.

One thing is clear: the future of performance management in the American workplace is still very much in question.

For more insight into this important topic, I recently sat down with a handful of thought leaders in the performance management space, including Rob Ollander-Krane, Senior Director of Organizational Performance Effectiveness at Gap, Inc., Nigel Adams, Global Chief Talent Officer at Razorfish Global, and Amy Herrbold, Senior Director of Organizational Development at Kellogg. Together, we discussed the future of performance management to understand, from their perspective, why changes to this process are long overdue.

Read more at The Future Of Performance Management Is Not One-Size-Fits-All

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Risk Management: A Look Back at 2013 and Ahead to 2014

Risk Management: A Look Back at 2013 and Ahead to 2014

According to Yo Delmar, vice president of MetricStream, 2013 has been witness to extraordinary change. We are living and doing business in an increasingly global, mobile, social and Big Data world, fraught with new risks and complex regulations. As such, individuals and organizations are struggling to keep pace.

In response to greater uncertainty, complexity and volatility throughout 2013, we’ve seen increased convergence and alignment amongst internal teams, including IT, security and the business. As a result, organizations are better poised to provide the context for communicating risks. We’ve also seen the business ecosystem evolve to include geographically diverse vendors and third parties, and as a result, organizations must continue to view these entities as part of the organization itself, and manage them in a more tightly and integrated way.

Growing convergence among IT, security and the business: The landscape of risk and compliance continues to evolve, as organizations are asked to manage their IT risk and compliance activities far beyond that of basic audit and compliance requirements of the past. As new technologies bring their own set of unique risks, there is a growing disconnect among internal audit, security, compliance and the business on what it means to build, manage and lead a truly safe, secure and successful business.

As a result, we are seeing more focused efforts when it comes to getting these groups on the same page by building a common risk language, as well as a discussion framework to enable cross-functional collaboration. Doing so can set the context for communicating risks in a way that drives more effective governance and decision-making across the board of directors, executive management team and each respective business function.

What is your 2014 resolutions? Leave us a comment or send us a message.

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